Census 2020

Shape the Future of Your Community Census 2020

Start here: 2020Census.gov 





Update August 7, 2020

Joint Statement from the Census Bureau and Centers for Disease Control on Conducting 2020 Census Non-Response Follow-Up Interviews

 


August 7, 2020 – In carrying out our respective missions, the U.S. Census Bureau and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are committed to protecting the health and safety of those we serve and employ. This is particularly important during the current COVID-19 health crisis.

Participation in 2020 Census interviews should present a low risk of transmission of COVID-19. Census takers are trained to rigorously and universally follow these CDC recommendations to mitigate risk of transmission:

Wearing of face masks.
Maintaining social distance of 6 ft. or more.
Practicing hand hygiene.
Not entering homes, and conducting interviews outside as much as possible or practical.
Household members encountered by census staff are encouraged to maintain social distances during interviews and practice the CDC’s other recommendations as much as possible.

The CDC stands ready to support the work of the Census Bureau and its staff in providing consultation and technical assistance to ensure that relevant data and findings are communicated in a timely fashion to keep Census field staff and household members safe and healthy. 



Update:

JULY 22, 2020 — The U.S. Census Bureau is sending reminder postcards this week to an estimated 34.3 million households. This will be the final mailing before census takers begin visiting nonresponding households across the nation in mid-August. Responding now minimizes the need for census takers to visit homes to collect responses in person.

According to the Census Bureau’s online map that tracks the nation’s participation in the census, more than 92 million households (or 62.3 percent of households) have already responded online, by phone or by mail.
The COVID-19 pandemic delayed the nationwide start of census taker visits from mid-May to mid-August, giving the Census Bureau the chance to send one more reminder to households encouraging them to respond on their own. A select number of areas will be part of the soft launch of the census taker visits as early as mid- and late July. The postcard is one reminder in a series of reminders that the Census Bureau has mailed nonresponding households since mid-March urging them to respond.

The Census Bureau strongly encourages the public to respond online at 2020census.gov. Households can respond online or by phone in English or 12 other languages. Households can also respond by mail using the paper questionnaire that was mailed in April to most nonresponding addresses. Households can continue to respond on their own until these visits conclude on October 31.

Households that have already responded may disregard the reminder postcard if they receive it. A small number of households that have already responded will receive a census taker visit as part of 2020 Census quality checks. 




Be Cool. Be Counted.

Census Response Representatives to Visit Low-Responding Areas

2020 Census Mobile Questionnaire Assistance Overview 

JULY 14, 2020 — More than 3,000 U.S. Census Bureau staff will begin going into communities with the lowest 2020 Census response rates to encourage and assist people with responding on their own to the 2020 Census. This operation, known as the Mobile Questionnaire Assistance (MQA) program, is a separate activity from census takers going door to door to count households that have not yet responded. MQA is part of the Census Bureau’s final push to encourage people to complete the 2020 Census before the Nonresponse Followup (NRFU) operation begins nationwide on August 11.

MQA representatives will encourage people to respond to the 2020 Census in open, public places in the lowest responding areas of the nation. These are places where people naturally visit when leaving home to help increase self-response rates. People are encouraged to respond on their own online or by phone. Locations for MQAs will include grocery stores and markets, food banks, laundromats, restaurants and grab-and-go eateries, unemployment offices, back to school drives, places of worship, and libraries.

The local census response representatives will help people complete the census on a 2020 Census tablet or on their own device, while practicing state and local social distancing protocols. All census workers have been trained in social distancing protocols and issued personal protective equipment (PPE), including masks to be worn during MQA support.

About 62% of households across the country have already responded online, by phone or by mail since invitations began arriving in mid-March. The Census Bureau is selecting where to provide MQA based on local response rates and conditions.

If people need help responding in a language other than English, Census Bureau staff can provide phone numbers or assistance responding online in 12 other languages. Staff will also have guides available in 59 languages that walk people through how to respond to the English questionnaire.

All staff will carry an ID badge with their name, photograph, a U.S. Department of Commerce watermark seal, and an expiration date. They will have an official Census Bureau-issued bag and tablet. MQA locations will have banners bearing the 2020 Census logo.

In the interest of public health concerns because of the COVID-19 pandemic, Census Bureau staff will decide on a weekly basis whether MQA activities will take place in a low-response area in coordination with local partners.

For more information, visit 2020census.gov.

MQA will be available from July 13 through September 18. 




May 26, 2020



An embedded Facebook post to the Northampton County, Virginia Government page shows the response rate for Northampton County to be at 36.4% compared to the rest of Virginia which is at 65.2%. Please visit the Census Response Rate page on the 2020Census.gov website for more details.




For Northampton County Millions of County Dollars are at Stake with an accurate census count.
"...if the count misses 1 percent of the population, or 120 people, it would mean a loss of $7 million in federal funding over a 10-year period."

Read the article in the Eastern Shore Post  by Stephanie Jackson dated March 14, 2019

Please consider your civic duty and be counted! 


Colorful People

Accomack and Northampton Counties form a regional Complete Count Committee



The Eastern Shore of Virginia could lose an estimated $20,000 in federal funding for each person who goes uncounted in the 2020 Census. This includes funding for many of the services citizens rely on like schools, public safety, libraries, and fire departments. To help ensure the Eastern Shore of Virginia has an accurate and complete count, Accomack and Northampton Counties formed a regional Complete Count Committee. The purpose of the Committee is to educate the community as to why it is important to complete the Census survey. The goal is to have every individual on the Shore counted.

The Committee, formed by Accomack County Administrator Michael Mason and Northampton County Administrator Charles Kolakowski, is comprised of community leaders on the Eastern Shore as recommended in the Census Complete Count manual. This includes community leaders from community organizations, business, education, faith-based organizations, the immigrant community, social services, and senior citizens. The Committee meets twice a month to identify outreach events and community communication outlets with which to distribute information about taking the Census.

Are You Ready for the 2020 Census? Get Prepared!By understanding why the Census is so important to community services, it is hoped individuals will want to answer the short, ten-question survey. The U.S. Constitution requires a Census of America’s population every ten years. It determines how many representatives each state gets in Congress and how to redraw district boundaries for elections. Communities rely on census statistics to plan for a variety of resident needs including new roads, schools, and emergency services. Businesses use census data to determine where to open places to shop. Each year, the federal government distributes more than $675 billion to states and communities based on Census Bureau data.

For the first time, you will be able to respond online or by phone, as well as by mail. By taking ten minutes to complete the survey online, you will not need to respond to a follow-up visit by a Census employee to your home. Starting March 12, 2020, the Census Bureau will mail postcards to residences with a code to start the survey. You can use this code or your home address to start completing the survey. Computers at all Eastern Shore Public Libraries are available for residents to complete the Census. Staff will be available to assist as needed.

All Census information is kept confidential, by law. An individual’s information is not shared with any other government agency. The Census does not ask for your social security number, banking information or political affiliation. The Census captures every person living in the United States, including babies, but only one survey needs to be filled out per household. The Census only happens every ten years, let’s be sure your friends and family are counted!
For more information, visit 2020Census.gov or call the main library in Accomac at 787-3400.





Census 2020 Shape your Future Start Here


 

April 25, 2020

If you are a Post Office Box holder you may not receive a census form by mail. 

 Census2020

Accomack County and Northampton County
Complete Count Committee



If you are a post office box holder you may not receive a census form by mail. Please go online or call to complete your census.

1. Take the Census online at: www.2020census.gov

2. Call Toll Free: [844] 330-2020 between 7:00AM and 2:00AM Eastern Time.



Respond to the 2020 Census
Posted on 07/22/2020

Press Release 
February 25, 2020

Census 2020 Shape your Future Start Here

February 13, 2020 – Between March 12 and March 20, invitations to participate in the 2020 Census will start arriving in households across the country.

“The Census Bureau is ready for the nation to respond next month,” said Census Bureau Director Dr. Steven Dillingham. “Millions of Americans are applying for 2020 Census jobs, more than 270,000 local and national organizations are engaged, and in less than 30 days the majority of U.S. households will receive an invitation to respond to help ensure that every person in the U.S. is counted.”

“The 2020 Census is on mission, on schedule, and on budget to promote an accurate count,” Dillingham continued. “Response is important because statistics from the census are used in distributing where hundreds of billions in funding for school lunches, hospitals, roads and much more. The invitations will remind respondents to include everyone living in the household, whether they are related or not. This includes young children. Your response will impact communities for the next decade.”

“The Census Bureau has successfully tested its data collection systems, has built backup systems to support resilient operations, and is ready to receive responses from all around the country,” added Dillingham.

This invitation will include instructions on how to respond to the 2020 Census online or by phone. By April 1, most households will have received an invitation delivered either by mail or by a census taker. In areas of the country that are less likely to respond online, a paper questionnaire will be included in the initial mailing to households. Reminder mailings will be sent to households that do not respond, and in the fourth mailing every household that has not yet responded will receive a paper questionnaire.

Once households receive invitations, please respond to the 2020 Census by using the provided Census ID. If a household is unable to enter the Census ID people can still respond, by providing an address. Whether people respond online, by phone or by mail, it is important to respond right away.

Below is a timeline of how and when the Census Bureau will invite households to complete the 2020 Census questionnaire:

March 12-20: Initial invitations to respond online and by phone will be delivered by the U.S. Postal Service. Areas that are less likely to respond online will receive a paper questionnaire along with the invitation to respond online or over the phone.

March 16-24: Reminder letters will be delivered.

March 26-April 3: Reminder postcards will be delivered to households that have not responded.

April 8-16: Reminder letters and paper questionnaires will be delivered to remaining households that have not responded.

April 20-27: Final reminder postcards will be delivered to households that have not yet responded before census takers follow up in person.

If a household does not respond to any of the invitations, a census taker will follow up in person sometime between May 13 and July 31. A sample of the 2020 Census paper questionnaire and preview of the online questionnaire is available, along with more information about when most people will receive their invitations in the mail.

The 2020 Census questionnaire is available online and by phone in English and 12 additional languages: Spanish, Chinese, Vietnamese, Korean, Russian, Arabic, Tagalog, Polish, French, Haitian Creole, Portuguese, and Japanese. These 13 languages cover the language needs of over 99% of all U.S. households. To help ensure a complete count of everyone, the Census Bureau will also provide video language guides, print language guides and language glossaries in 59 non-English languages, including American Sign Language, Braille, and Large Print.

The U.S. Constitution mandates a census of the population every 10 years. Census statistics help determine the number of seats each state holds in the U.S. House of Representatives and how billions of dollars in federal funds are allocated to state and local communities for the next 10 years.

For more information about the 2020 Census, visit 2020census.gov.